What Executive Productivity Hinges On

How many dashboards or lists are important to manage for your business? For many professionals, it becomes overwhelming to manage them all well. And yet, most of them are vital to effectively growing your businesses. We tend to grow what we are focused on.

What if you set up a simple system for yourself each morning to make sure you gave attention to the lists that were most important? It could become almost like brushing your teeth or taking a vitamin as a habit.

This simple habit could move the needle forward in relationships, projects, marketing, and management, placing the next step in someone else’s court.

With intentionality and creativity you may find ways to consolidate your lists or move through them with ease and speed, moving through those with greatest priority to those with less. This would free up yourself for new opportunities throughout the day. And you wouldn’t feel bogged down by slodging along through these lists the entire day or stressed from ignoring them.

Don Dalrymple

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As work relentlessly gets democratized, it’s hard for people to get formal training that was once consolidated within large industrial companies. The internet does continually grow with knowledge and content and this should suffice to educate everyone. But it’s hard to make sense of all the information or put it into strategies that make an impact.

Knowledge work demands that we move information and make decisions quickly. While everyone is not officially titled as an executive, we have to make decisions efficiently.

There’s a lot written on creating big visions, mission statements and developing strategies. But there is something even more foundational that should be part of any good executive’s daily ritual. It is a critical daily habit that allows for extreme leverage across projects. It is the habit of list management.

Managing Across Your Lists

Think about how many logins you have. You have a login for your email…

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Make Good Deals So We Don’t Hate Each Other

Deal-making is inherent to all businesses.

You make deals every step of the way – with your software providers, landlord, vendors, customers, partners – just to name a few.

Every relationship offers you the opportunity to “win” or “lose.” Ideally, everybody wins. But getting to that ideal is tricky, requiring masterful skill and clarity.

Here are a few things to keep in mind in order to make sure you set up good agreements that benefit both yourself and the others involved, in order to enjoy long-term success.

Don Dalrymple

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I have always said,

“Good agreements make for great relationships. Bad agreements make for bad relationships.”

And having done many deals over many years, I can see where I have had a profitable and fun relationship when there are explicit expectations. And when there has been innuendo or ambiguity, relationships suffer because there is not a good agreement.

There are a lot of reasons bad deals happen. Sometimes it’s out of laziness on one or both parties. Other times, goodwill. I have made many of the mistakes and I am not one to keep repeating a script that doesn’t work. I want great relationships and have a lot of fun at it. Sure, there’s opportunities for making money, but I also enjoy people and life. Life’s too short to miss the fun.

So, if you’re like me and want to avoid the mess of unmet expectations or resentments that follow…

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Fooled by the Law of Diminishing Returns

Is more always better?

We all know the answer to that. But the trickier question is, “WHEN is more actually not better?” As our businesses grow, it’s easy to get pulled into adopting more systems, adding in more headcount, scheduling more events, developing more products.

At what point do these things start to have a diminishing return in revenue? Don offers a few key questions to ask yourself when you are considering doing more.

Don Dalrymple

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At some point, the effort and cost are not worth it anymore. The Law of Diminishing Returns kicks in when building a business or even building a life. More investment of your time, money and attention may initially have high returns, but then at some point, the rewards taper.

Will more efficiency make a large impact on your revenue?

How many more relationships start to become a liability to manage rather than pure enjoyment?

Does more money create more happiness after a certain point? They say $75K is that point of diminishing return from research studies.

Sometimes, I can’t find the motivation to do more. Perhaps, that law of diminishing return is instinctive and I’m only responding. Or experience simply shows me that more does not equal better. In fact, more may mean cost.

I see it with business owners that add more headcount and find more headaches or layers of management…

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How to Game Opportunities Your Way

There is one undeniable “secret” to success in business, and that is consistency in the right habits. Most of the success stories we read are about people with “pigheaded determination” who show up day after day after day sharing their value and message with those who need to hear it most.

We are easily distracted, and it usually takes 5-12 similar messages to begin to listen to someone new. How can you set yourself up to make sure you are in front of the right person that many times before giving up?

“Business is a game of probabilities.” How can you increase your probabilities and game success for yourself and your company?

Don offers a few practical ideas in this article.

Don Dalrymple

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It really is enticing to buy into some fad, secret sauce or crowd hype especially when it comes to deal making and opportunities. It feels secure to do the “right things” and rely on determinism.

That kind of thinking may have been true before the floodgates of access were opened and anyone and everyone could participate with their voice, ideas or projects. On the one hand I’m excited and root heavily for all the new participants in the marketplace. I like being able to think of something, look it up and implement it quickly if it is worthwhile. I like that I can connect with everyone and anyone quickly.

However, getting through all that noise to get attention and being someone that stands out becomes even more challenging. You get mixed in with the noise hitting everyone’s phones.

Business is a game of probabilities. You can increase your chances to…

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